Assessment 2 manage business documents (1)

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Assessment 2 manage business documents (1)

Part 1- Questions

1. A brochure illustrating products available

a. layout

b. spreadsheet

c. word processing

d. database

2. A department budget

a. layout

b. spreadsheet

c. word processing

d. database

3. A 2000-word report

a. layout

b. spreadsheet

c. word processing

d. database

4. A Letter to a customer

a. layout

b. spreadsheet

c. word processing

d. database

5. Information on customers’ names and addresses to be kept indefinitely, updates regularly and used for a variety of purposes

a. layout

b. spreadsheet

c. word processing

d. database

6. 6. Consider the examples shown below (follow the links)-

JB Were investor information: http://www.jbwere.com.au/Products/InvestorSeminars/

Audience – Investors and shareholders

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Assessment 2 manage business documents (1)
Last updated: Feb 2024

Page 1

olders

Image – strong finance investment

How? – through investing information and growth estimations

Fun for Kids Festival: http://www.fun4kids.com.au/workshops. HTM

Audience – children and parents

Image – good fun time

How? – exciting activities and good fun for all families

7. How might the way an organisation operates change (for example, the organisation might expand) and how might these changes affect the documentation standards used by the organisation?

Change happens in every organization. Some companies grow larger while others may need to down-size. Many organizations may see the need for a change in vision, whether once or multiple times. Learning how to manage organizational change is key to making these transitions go more smoothly, regardless of what the change entails.

These changes can impact the documentation standards a lot because the changes will make the company style guides and templates change. it is important to consult all stakeholders and staff about any changes and give staff information about the changes.

Part 2 – Computer Workspace Guide

Step 1: Find your natural posture

Scoot your chair away from your desk and sit down comfortably. For many people, it would look a lot like sitting in a car. Your feet are on the floor in front of you; your hands are in your lap; and your shoulders relax as you lean back just a bit.

Step 2: Keyboard and mouse placement

Building around the natural posture, the keyboard and mouse should be positioned in a way that keeps your elbows to your sides, and your arms at or below a 90-degree angle. This way, the muscle load is reduced and you’re not straining.

Height. Position your keyboard 1 to 2 inches above your thighs. For most people, that probably means employing a pull-out keyboard tray. Alternatively, you can lower your desk, but the keyboard tray is a preferred method. Here’s why.

Tilt. The keyboard should ideally be positioned with a negative tilt — down and away from you, so that your arms and hand follow the downward slope of your thighs. That being said, never use the kickstands provided underneath most keyboards.

Position. Ideally, your keyboard and mouse should be shoulder-distance apart and as level as possible. A couple of things will help you achieve this.

First, consider purchasing a keyboard without a number pad, as the number pad puts the letter keys — your primary input tools — off-center. As for keeping the mouse and keyboard level, you might want to raise your keyboard with some DIYing, or get a flatter mouse.

Step 3: Position your screen

Setting up your screen, or screens, doesn’t have to be complicated. Arrange them in this order, and you’ll be set.

Distance. If your screen is too far away, you’ll start doing something ergonomics experts like to call “turtling,” or craning your neck. Place the monitor too far away, and you’ll find yourself extending to reach it.

To find the sweet spot, sit back and extend your arm. The tips of your middle finger should land on your screen. That’s it.

Step 4: Adjust that chair

Your chair is your best ergonomic friend. It supports your back, your bottom, and your posture. There are many chairs to choose from, but only a few important things to look out for.

Shape. Think back to your natural posture. With your tailbone sticking out just a bit, and your vertebrae in their slight curve, the lumbar portion of your spine points in toward your belly. To help you sustain this posture, find a chair that offers good lumbar support.

Length. When you sit down, there should be a little space between the edge of the chair and the back of your knees, about the size of your fist. Depending on…

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Assessment 2 manage business documents (1)
Last updated: Feb 2024

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